Feed Lot

AUG 2018

Feedlots and cow/calf operations in the beef industry who feed 500 or more has annually on grains and concentrates; maintain 500 or more beef cows; backgrounder, stocker/grower, preconditioner; veterinarian, nutritionist, consultant

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150 mg/mL ANTIMICROBIAL NADA 141-328, Approved by FDA For subcutaneous injection in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older or in calves to be processed for veal. Caution: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. READ ENTIRE BROCHURE CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS PRODUCT. INDICATIONS ZACTRAN is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. ZACTRAN is also indicated for the control of respiratory disease in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. CONTRAINDICATIONS As with all drugs, the use of ZACTRAN is contraindicated in animals previously found to be hypersensitive to this drug. WARNING: FOR USE IN CATTLE ONLY. NOT FOR USE IN HUMANS. KEEP THIS AND ALL DRUGS OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. NOT FOR USE IN CHICKENS OR TURKEYS. The material safety data sheet (MSDS) contains more detailed occupational safety information. To report adverse effects, obtain an MSDS or for assistance, contact Merial at 1-888-637-4251. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Do not treat cattle within 35 days of slaughter. Because a discard time in milk has not been established, do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. PRECAUTIONS The effects of ZACTRAN on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Subcutaneous injection of ZACTRAN may cause a transient local tissue reaction in some cattle that may result in trim loss of edible tissues at slaughter. ADVERSE REACTIONS Transient animal discomfort and mild to moderate injection site swelling may be seen in cattle treated with ZACTRAN. EFFECTIVENESS The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the treatment of BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni was demonstrated in a field study conducted at four geographic locations in the United States. A total of 497 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of BRD were enrolled in the study. Cattle were administered ZACTRAN (6 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline as a subcutaneous injection once on Day 0. Cattle were observed daily for clinical signs of BRD and were evaluated for clinical success on Day 10. The percentage of successes in cattle treated with ZACTRAN (58%) was statistically significantly higher (p<0.05) than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (19%). The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the treatment of BRD associated with M. bovis was demonstrated independently at two U.S. study sites. A total of 502 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of BRD were enrolled in the studies. Cattle were administered ZACTRAN (6 mg/ kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline as a subcutaneous injection once on Day 0. At each site, the percentage of successes in cattle treated with ZACTRAN on Day 10 was statistically significantly higher than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (74.4% vs. 24% [p <0.001], and 67.4% vs. 46.2% [p = 0.002]). In addition, in the group of calves treated with gamithromycin that were confirmed positive for M. bovis (pre-treatment nasopharyngeal swabs), there were more calves at each site (45 of 57 calves, and 5 of 6 calves) classified as successes than as failures. The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida was demonstrated in two independent studies conducted in the United States. A total of 467 crossbred beef cattle at high risk of developing BRD were enrolled in the study. ZACTRAN (6 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline was administered as a single subcutaneous injection within one day after arrival. Cattle were observed daily for clinical signs of BRD and were evaluated for clinical success on Day 10 post-treatment. In each of the two studies, the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with ZACTRAN (86% and 78%) was statistically significantly higher (p = 0.0019 and p = 0.0016) than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (36% and 58%). Marketed by Merial Limited 3239 Satellite Blvd., Duluth, GA 30096-4640 U.S.A. Made in Austria ®ZACTRAN is a registered trademark of Merial. ©2016 Merial. All rights reserved. Rev. 01/2016 that aren't "derived from harvested production of livestock or poultry." With some analysts projecting lab-grown "meat" will be a $ 5 . 2 billion global business by 2020, cat- tlemen need to pay attention to the plight of the dairy industry. It's time to legally define what can be called beef. NCBA president Kevin Kester said, "It is critical that the federal government step up to the plate and enforce fair and accurate labeling for fake meat. As long as we have a level playing field, our product will continue to be the leading protein choice for families…" NCBA is requesting that the USDA (specifically the Food Safe- ty Inspection Service or FSIS) be given jurisdiction over foods consisting of, or produced from cell cultures or tissue. Routing jurisdiction through the FSIS will provide greater protection against false and misleading marketing claims through questionable label- ing, NCBA says. But right now, another govern- mental agency is staking claim to regulating fake meat. Can you guess which one? The same one who hasn't been enforcing accurate milk labeling for the last several years – the FDA. FL I've never milked an almond. And I bet you haven't either. That's part of the argument the dairy industry is using to rein in what is called milk. Dairymen aren't asking for a new rule so that items like soy milk would lose its "milk" name. Instead they are asking the FDA to enforce a regulation already on the books. The FDA's current stan- dard of identity talks about milk being a product of a lactating animal. However in recent years, soy milk, al- mond milk and other white beverages have taken hold with consumers who see these products as a healthy version of what Elsie has been producing for decades. This battle for the dairy indus- try is nothing new. It has lodged complaints for years about labeling violations of products called "milk," much to the yawn of the FDA. So when the FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in late July that his agency will soon begin enforcing standards of identity for milk, dairy farms across the nation uttered a big "finally" in unison. It sounds as though the FDA has come around to enforcing their own rules, but truth be told it will take some time. The agency held a hearing in late July to get public input on enforcing existing regulations, so don't expect the al- mond milk commercials to change anytime soon. But why should any of this make a difference to beef producers? It's all about labeling. Lab grown "meat" products are rapidly catch- ing the attention of consumers, and meat groups (think beef groups) are concerned the term "meat" might go the way "milk" has for the last several years. Outgoing Missouri governor Eric Greitens recently signed a measure prohib- iting companies in the state from misrepresenting products as meat Fair Labeling BY JILL J. DUNKEL EDITOR'S DESK 4 FEED•LOT August 2018

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