Feed Lot

SEP-OCT 2018

Feedlots and cow/calf operations in the beef industry who feed 500 or more has annually on grains and concentrates; maintain 500 or more beef cows; backgrounder, stocker/grower, preconditioner; veterinarian, nutritionist, consultant

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28 FEED•LOT September/October 2018 150 mg/mL ANTIMICROBIAL NADA 141-328, Approved by FDA For subcutaneous injection in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older or in calves to be processed for veal. Caution: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. READ ENTIRE BROCHURE CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS PRODUCT. INDICATIONS ZACTRAN is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. ZACTRAN is also indicated for the control of respiratory disease in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. CONTRAINDICATIONS As with all drugs, the use of ZACTRAN is contraindicated in animals previously found to be hypersensitive to this drug. WARNING: FOR USE IN CATTLE ONLY. NOT FOR USE IN HUMANS. KEEP THIS AND ALL DRUGS OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. NOT FOR USE IN CHICKENS OR TURKEYS. The material safety data sheet (MSDS) contains more detailed occupational safety information. To report adverse effects, obtain an MSDS or for assistance, contact Merial at 1-888-637-4251. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Do not treat cattle within 35 days of slaughter. Because a discard time in milk has not been established, do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. PRECAUTIONS The effects of ZACTRAN on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Subcutaneous injection of ZACTRAN may cause a transient local tissue reaction in some cattle that may result in trim loss of edible tissues at slaughter. ADVERSE REACTIONS Transient animal discomfort and mild to moderate injection site swelling may be seen in cattle treated with ZACTRAN. EFFECTIVENESS The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the treatment of BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni was demonstrated in a field study conducted at four geographic locations in the United States. A total of 497 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of BRD were enrolled in the study. Cattle were administered ZACTRAN (6 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline as a subcutaneous injection once on Day 0. Cattle were observed daily for clinical signs of BRD and were evaluated for clinical success on Day 10. The percentage of successes in cattle treated with ZACTRAN (58%) was statistically significantly higher (p<0.05) than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (19%). The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the treatment of BRD associated with M. bovis was demonstrated independently at two U.S. study sites. A total of 502 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of BRD were enrolled in the studies. Cattle were administered ZACTRAN (6 mg/ kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline as a subcutaneous injection once on Day 0. At each site, the percentage of successes in cattle treated with ZACTRAN on Day 10 was statistically significantly higher than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (74.4% vs. 24% [p <0.001], and 67.4% vs. 46.2% [p = 0.002]). In addition, in the group of calves treated with gamithromycin that were confirmed positive for M. bovis (pre-treatment nasopharyngeal swabs), there were more calves at each site (45 of 57 calves, and 5 of 6 calves) classified as successes than as failures. The effectiveness of ZACTRAN for the control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida was demonstrated in two independent studies conducted in the United States. A total of 467 crossbred beef cattle at high risk of developing BRD were enrolled in the study. ZACTRAN (6 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent volume of sterile saline was administered as a single subcutaneous injection within one day after arrival. Cattle were observed daily for clinical signs of BRD and were evaluated for clinical success on Day 10 post-treatment. In each of the two studies, the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with ZACTRAN (86% and 78%) was statistically significantly higher (p = 0.0019 and p = 0.0016) than the percentage of successes in the cattle treated with saline (36% and 58%). Marketed by Merial Limited 3239 Satellite Blvd., Duluth, GA 30096-4640 U.S.A. Made in Austria ®ZACTRAN is a registered trademark of Merial. ©2016 Merial. All rights reserved. Rev. 01/2016 MANAGEMENT presents major challenges for the beef industry and can often jeop- ardize the health and well-being of livestock. We are grateful that Rep- resentative Yoho and 45 bipartisan cosponsors stepped up to support the legislation." A similar bill, the Modernizing Agricultural Transportation Act, was introduced in the Senate. According to FMCSA, the up- coming Advanced Notice of Pro- posed Rulemaking (ANPRM), which will be published in the Federal Register, responds to wide- spread Congressional, industry, and citizen concerns and seeks feedback from the public to deter- mine if HOS revisions may alleviate unnecessary burdens placed on drivers while maintaining safety on our nation's highways and roads. The four specific areas under consideration for revision are: • Expanding the current 100 air- mile "short-haul" exemption from 12 hours on-duty to 14 hours on-duty, in order to be consistent with the rules for long-haul truck drivers; • Extending the current 14 -hour on-duty limitation by up to two hours when a truck driv- er encounters adverse driving conditions; • Revising the current mandatory 30 -minute break for truck driv- ers after 8-hours of continuous driving; and • Reinstating the option for splitting up the required 10-hour off-duty rest break for drivers operating trucks that are equipped with a sleeper-berth compartment. Instructions on making public comments on the issue can be found at www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regu- lations/hours-service-advanced-no- tice-proposed-rulemaking FL The Federal Motor Carrier Safe- ty Administration (FMCSA) an- nounced in late August an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Hours of Service (HOS) regula- tions. FMCSA is seeking public comment on revising HOS regula- tions for interstate truck drivers. Advanced notice for the public comment was limited, with the first public listening session taking place just three days after the press release announcing the public com- ment period was published. The comment period will be open for 30 days. Earlier this year, the congressio- nally mandated electronic logging device (ELD) rule, which required most FMCSA-regulated motor carriers to convert their records from paper to an electronic format, became effective. According to FMCSA, compliance with the ELD rule has reached nearly 99 percent across the trucking industry, how- ever it has also brought focus to HOS regulations, especially with regard to certain regulations having a significant impact on agriculture and other sectors of trucking. Almost immediately, an ELD exemption was granted to those hauling livestock and other sensitive agricultural commodities, citing that animals and other items like produce could not survive or would be damaged sitting on the side of the road during mandated breaks. In June, the Transporting Live- stock Safety Across America Act was introduced to the U.S. House of Representatives. NCBA president Kevin Kester said, "The House ver- sion of the Transporting Livestock Across America Act is another important step toward fixing the current Hours of Service rules for livestock haulers. The status quo Positive Step: Public Comment Period Open on Hours of Service Rules

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